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Checkout the most recent installments of our favorite Reformed Christian Podcasts, videos and articles from various broadcasters and reformed bloggers.

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Contemporary Worship

Today Redneck Theologian discusses John 2 and how it relates to contemporary worship.

Why did God choose you?

Today Sy Benn discusses why God chose you.

Communion

Today Box of Rocks Theologian discusses the importance of communion.

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LATEST ARTICLES

Relevant, Old Paths

Much of society is being overtaken by a youth-driven culture because we have neglected God’s call to train up the next generation of young people in the way they should go. If we are to redirect the current paths of young people, we must begin in the church by taking up the charge to come alongside younger men and women, and teach them the old, ancient values of God’s Word.

My dad was fifty-two years old when I was born. When I was thirteen, he asked me if I was embarrassed that he was so much older than my friends’ dads. I told him I wasn’t embarrassed but that I respected him and learned more from him because he was older. He was born a few years after the end of World War I and fought in World War II. He had a newspaper route during the Great Depression, and he told me stories about real cowboys, bank robbers, and his father, who grew up at the turn of the twentieth century in the old West in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri. My dad wasn’t just older than my friends’ dads, he was from a different era, an era when young men respected old men and when old men raised young men to be men and not just guys. It was a time when older men and older women took seriously the biblical charge to teach and train younger men and women in old values such as integrity, service, loyalty, sacrifice, honor, wisdom, hard work, and humility.
My father’s values were old, traditional values.
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Know Thyself

Written by T. M. Suffield |
Sunday, June 16, 2024
With our souls fogged by sin we are natural hypocrites; knowing ourselves is like trying to drive in a steamed-up car. Knowing the world is about as difficult. We see what we expect to see. Matthew Lee Anderson puts it like this: “We will not see if we do not want to see—and we will only see what we want to see.”

Your intentions are often not transparent, even to you. Sin’s dark shadow means we must always think that there’s an iceberg of ourselves we haven’t fathomed, with much unseen and looming beneath the surface. The motivations for our actions, our thoughts, our feelings, even for the questions we grapple with, are more opaque than we like to think they are.
I know myself much better than I did a decade ago. It would be foolish to think that I know myself. We are very skilled at hiding ourselves from ourselves. It’s instinctive, like grabbing figs leaves to cover up something we don’t want seen, even by ourselves. Fig leaf sap is a nasty irritant, which says about everything you need to know about the human condition.
We give ourselves the benefit of the doubt over and over in ways we wouldn’t for anyone else. We allow behaviour in ourselves that deeply frustrates us in others; sometimes that’s why it frustrates us in others. With our souls fogged by sin we are natural hypocrites; knowing ourselves is like trying to drive in a steamed-up car.
Knowing the world is about as difficult. We see what we expect to see. Matthew Lee Anderson puts it like this:
“We will not see if we do not want to see—and we will only see what we want to see.”
Called into Questions, 98.
I think he’s right. Since I first read these words a year ago, they’ve been bouncing around my head. I only see what I want to see. I can’t see what I don’t want to. And, presumably, my sense of my self is blinded by sin enough that I have little awareness of this process or what it is that I wanted to see in the first place.
It’s hard to know yourself. It’s hard to know the world.
Are we stuck between a rock and a hard place? Or, perhaps better, a fuzzy indistinct thingy and a something-or-other?
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When the Desire to be Accepted Sets In

In Christ, there is nothing that we could ever do for our Father to disown us. The acceptance that we receive from the Creator and Sustainer of the universe should overshadow the acceptance that we try to achieve from other people whose opinion does not truly matter. At the end of the day, only God could rightfully judge us and hold us accountable. 

We long to be accepted. Sadly, we look for acceptance in the wrong places. Usually, we look for acceptance from our families, our workmates, and our friends. If we make the acceptance from the people in our lives as something that we derive our value from then we would be distressed every time people do not affirm us. It could be a snare that would make us please people rather than God.
So, what do we when the desire to be accepted sets in?
The greatest acceptance that we could ever receive is the acceptance that God gives when a person puts his faith in Jesus Christ. In Christ, we are eternally accepted by our Father.
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